Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up

Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up

This attracts a lot of people making money by posting videos on YouTube.

Tutorials, family vacations, product reviews and other silly antics make the rich overnight.

But have you ever heard of weedtubers?

These are the people who get paid to smoke marijuana and put it up on the internet.

That’s right – get paid for baking.

Read on to find out some of the most famous weedtubers around.

Joel Hradecky: King Weedtubers
Considered the king of the weedtubers, Joel Hradecky has over 1.2 million followers, whom he found only in a short time.

His CustomGrow420 YouTube channel featured videos including him who tried to suck THC oil grams. This video garnered over 1.3 million views.

That number is almost the same as 1.5 million who saw Hradecky cough for seven minutes after his effort. It seems that Hradecky’s success thrives, in part, on the psychological notion that humans enjoy watching other humans suffer. Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up

But this marijuana king not only toke up and make the audience laugh (or mock) over the love of entertainment. Thousands of fans actually turned to Hradecky for recommendations about bongs, strands of marijuana and other accessories.

Josh Young
If you are primarily looking for advice and information about smoking weeds, different ways can be smoked, or weed prices, Young is your man.

On her YouTube channel StrainCentral, smoking young marijuana from 3-10 times a day, right next to the viewers.

Young thinks that sometimes his fans are just, “looking for friends smoking.”

In the same way as other weedtubers like Hradecky, Young also posted a video showing the effort to smoke a large quantity of THC in a short time and its horrible effects.

With over 373,000 subscribers, Young obviously makes a really good smoking buddy!

Reef Reef Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up
Being a harvester is not just for boys. Do not worry women, you can also be famous for smoking on YouTube too!

Just look at Coral Reefer. If you are looking for an interactive weedtube experience, Coral Reefer is your girl.

Coral Reefer hosts a live show every Sunday called “Stoney Sunday Live” where she answers pitch-related questions from viewers and fans. Coral is very passionate about marijuana and its many benefits.

Visit her channel and you’ll see her attend the cannabis show and share info about what’s going on in marijuana news.

Jane Dro
Another grass enthusiast who represents female cannabis lovers out there is Jane Dro. Meet Weedtubers Who Paid to Toke Up

If you want a more educational experience when it comes to marijuana, Dro is a great information center. Dro tells viewers about the growing ins and outs of marijuana and offers tips, as well as the look inside his own farming chamber.

Check out Dro channels for video and in-depth product reviews for serious and serious cannabis users. You might even see the following marijuana smoking star on our list while watching the Dro channel – both of which often appear in their respective videos.

Soundrone
You can not have a good smoking session without some nice snacks. Soundrone is about unboxing and reviewing products – and not just marijuana related items.

Visiting this unique channel channel will allow you to see candy, drink and snack reviews. A perfect compliment to your height.

His studies are often distracted by him who gets beaten from a bong or dull. Soundrone must have done something right because not only was he a successful successor, he was also a businessman.

Soundrone has its own hex axis line known as Bee Lasso.

Are you Next Next Big YouTube?
It’s hard not to be motivated by these itedtuber stars. They get paid to do what they love – that’s a great American dream, is not it?

Keeping your Winter Holiday Green

Keeping your Winter Holiday Green

We live in a time where people are becoming increasingly eco-conscious, and both cor-porations and individuals are doing more than ever to reduce their carbon footprint. This is fantastic news and very important in a bid to protect our planet and reduce the impact of global warming, but there is still a lot of work to be done. The good news is that even small changes can have a huge impact.
As a rapidly growing industry that’s set in natural surroundings, the skiing community must look for ways to keep winter holidays green without compromising on the quality of stays in catered ski chalets and shredding powder on the mountain. If you have a ski trip coming up and want to do your bit, here are a few simple ways to have an eco-friendly holiday.

 

Public Transportation

One great way to protect the environment is to opt for public transportation instead of taking your own car. The local public transport system is usually free with a lift pass, and offers a good chance to make a few new friends along the way. Using the local train network is also a good option if you want to venture outside of the resort and explore.

Recycling in Your Chalet

There has been a huge push to encourage recycling in ski resorts in recent years. Simply separate your rubbish from what can be recycled and take it down to the recycling point. This only takes a few minutes, but has a very positive impact on the environment.

Gear from Eco-Friendly Companies

There are a growing number of eco-friendly ski and snowboard companies that provide gear that does not harm the environment. This includes using eco-friendly waxes on snowboards and skis that are made from sustainable, reclaimed or recycled materials. For a great and guilt-free experience in the snow, why not consider renting or buying this equipment from a company that is doing its part to save our planet?

Chalet Hire from Reputable Companies

One of the easiest ways to go green is to book your catered ski chalet from a reputable company that has actively taken steps to combat damaging the environment. Take your time to research the company, and keep your eyes peeled for those that adhere to an AITO recognised environmental policy.

Getting There

Transport is always a concern when it comes to green holidays. Flying can produce three times more CO2 emissions per passenger than other forms of public transportation, so avoid this if possible. Good alternatives include driving (car shares are even better) and going by train (there are many stations throughout the Alps).

Offset Carbon

If you do decide to fly, you can still do your bit by offsetting your carbon (certain airlines provide this option at the time of booking). A few options include getting a shared transfer or bus from the airport/train station and using a transfer company that offsets their carbon.

Adhering to Resort Environmental Issues

If you choose a resort that has environmentally friendly practices in place, be sure to ad-here to these during your stay. The staff members know how to best protect the site, and they can make it easy for you to do your bit whilst still enjoying your stay.

Never has it been more important for people to reduce their environmental impact than today. Fortunately, this can be relatively straightforward during a stay in a catered ski chalet, and will allow us all to continue skiing without damaging the beautiful surround-ings.

Water History: Barge Building in France

Water History: Barge Building in France

Even though you may be a barge vacation lover in France, how much do you really know about the history of this mode of transportation? Although waterways are now reserved for holiday activities, tourism and barge holidays, the French have relied on simple barges to maintain and grow their economies. Actually, for centuries the canals and rivers are an important component of the French trading network, connecting the English Channel, Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Water History: Barge Building in France
Standardization and Transportation

Despite this crucial relation of the river, transportation is sluggish due to lack of standardization across the country. At the end of the nineteenth century, Minister of Public Works, Freycinet, had a lightbulb moment: he decided to set up a waterway network by building the same sized locks across the country. This key measures 40m x 5.20m and, once installed, the ship must be redesigned to fit within it. The new timber ship, sometimes known as the ‘Freycinet barge’, is built in dimensions of 38.5m with 5.0mm as standard. This modern standard cargo ship can deliver goods across Europe. Water History: Barge Building in France

However, how do these non-motorized ships move around the complex European canal network? The answer is the power of man – even though actual pulling is done by women, horses and even children throughout the 1800s, as well as men. Some – like Klippers and Tjalks who travel to England – use screen and other power, in Belgium and Holland, are pulled by steam-powered tugs. Progress, though faster because of standardization, can not be called fast because most people will travel on foot.

Triggering the Nation

In a drastic change in how channel transportation operated, the 1900s saw the launch of a diesel engine that eliminated the need for a puller altogether. However, because the engine is not very strong, motorized vessels like Spitzen and Luxemotors must have a distinctive pointed bow similar to the pull. This new creation is very luxurious because it comes with a kitchen and toilet – more than a few houses at that time – and independent.

By the 1920’s the wooden hull had been exchanged for steel, making stronger and tougher cargo ships that could withstand potential impacts with locks. Twenty years later the diesel engine has gained more power and many motorized barges are built throughout France, Belgium and the Netherlands. This is the peak of this industry in Europe. Non-motorized ships are drawn by diesel-powered tractors, not horses, so travel time is greatly reduced.

Goodbye to all that

The decline in French water transport began in the 1970s as faster and more efficient railways and road vehicles grew in popularity. The canals, once the source of life of the country, fell into disrepair and unfortunately not restored. Hundreds of Freycinet barges were canceled and it seemed to be the end of this crucial vessel lane.

Fortunately, barge holidays in France make this traditional form of water transport alive. Tourism blossomed in the 1970s, attracting visitors to the canals and rivers of France has not subsided in nearly four decades. Barge holidays in France showcase the country’s most beautiful and interesting areas to visitors who appreciate the gentle pace, and an alternative point of view, that barge hotels give them access.

Paul Newman is a Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider if you are looking for all the luxury holidays in France or other great destinations. Part of an experienced barge team, Paul first queued to support a slow-paced barging cruise facility for anyone looking for a unique holiday experience. Water History: Barge Building in France

Underwater Shipwrecks: The Most Dramatic of Dive Sites

Underwater Shipwrecks: The Most Dramatic of Dive Sites

Whether you’re a seasoned diver or just starting out, there’s an undeniable romanticism and sense of adventure around wreck dives that you won’t be able to get elsewhere. The excitement builds while you’re in a speedboat zipping through the immense expanse of blue, wind whipping your hair and you into a frenzy. Often you’ll not spot any signs of civilisation as far as the eye can see and then, suddenly, with all your gear securely in place, it’s overboard and underwater into a magical world where ghostly ship remains loom as if from nowhere, waiting to be explored…
If this sounds tempting, the reality is much better. Do these thrilling historical sites offering spectacular dives, stunning reefs and enchanting folklore call to you? Great: here are three of the best this fine planet has to offer.

 

Townsville, Australia

The Great Barrier Reef is the a fabulous dive site any diver worth their salt has explored, and this British-built luxury passenger ship which fell victim to a cyclone back in 1911 is arguably its crowning jewel. Teeming with marine life and a spectacular ship in itself, if you’re only ever going to take the plunge with one wreck dive ever then this should be a strong contender.

Grand Anse, Grenada

The Bianca C has become known as the Titanic of the Caribbean after it sank in 1961 due to a boiler room explosion and consequent fire which lasted several days. At 180 metres (600 feet) long, this is the largest shipwreck you can dive in the Caribbean. If you have your full wreck dive insurance certifications then you’re in for even more fun as you’ll have multiple chances to enter the wreck.

Chuuk Lagoon, Federated States of Micronesia

Are you on the hunt for a travel destination which boasts a true wealth of wreck diving options? Then look no further than Micronesia. This little section of paradise in Oceania is undoubtedly the place for you. In years gone by it was thought to be the most formidable of Japanese strongholds in the whole of the Pacific during WWII, and Chuuk Lagoon was completely devastated after an American attack on the base back in 1944. 249 aircraft, 32 merchant ships and 12 warships sank, with over 20 wrecks having been discovered since. You’ll be like a kid in a sweetshop deciding which dives to do — some of the most popular include the 500 foot (153 metre) Shikoku Maru and the 440 foot (134 metre) Fujikawa Maru.

Mayday Mayday!

Not every travel insurance covers you for wreck diving, and some dive insurance won’t cover you below 18 metres. Let’s Go Insure’s dive insurance provides cover for up to 50 metres as long as you have the necessary qualifications. Get in touch with our team today to make sure your once in a lifetime dive insurance needs are met.